Agri-Inject is offering a reasonable cost for anyone with a center pivot or linear irrigation system.

According to Erik Tribelhorn, CEO of Agri-Inject, applying fertilizer and crop protection products through irrigation systems with Agri-Inject fluid injection technology just makes sense, agronomically, environmentally and most importantly, economically.

“By applying a portion of the fertilizer, a fungicide, insecticide or even a herbicide through the pivot, the producer is automatically saving the cost of a separate application,” Tribelhorn relates. “Plus, the timing can be on the producer’s schedule, not on when a commercial applicator can get you on the schedule or when the weather is conducive for an aerial applicator to fly it on. Chemigation or fertigation lets you apply the precise amount of crop fertilizer injection and/or crop protection products at precisely the right times during the growing season.”

Tribelhorn said studies have also shown that chemical application through a pivot is just as consistent and accurate as that applied with a commercial sprayer or aerial applicator. Periodic application of fertilizer through the pivot is also one of the best ways to spoon feed nitrogen at a rate that the plant uses it.

“Fertigation is an efficient method of supplying part of the nitrogen needed for the crop through the irrigation system, near the time of maximum nitrogen uptake,” stated Bruce Bosley, a former cropping systems and natural resources agent with Colorado State University Cooperative Extension prior to his retirement in March 2015. “While the amounts of uptake will vary slightly with hybrid, the most rapid period of N uptake is between the eighth leaf and tasseling growth stages. During this time, a steady supply of N is critical to ensure optimum yield.”

Another study at Iowa State University found that when spring weather is uncooperative, getting corn planted should take priority over making nitrogen fertilizer applications. When that happens, there needs to be a plan in place to get nitrogen applications completed after planting and crop emergence. Fertigation, where applicable, can generally be part of that plan.

Tribelhorn says applying a large percentage of the fertilizer through the pivot can also be good insurance.

“If you apply a portion of the nitrogen on pre-plant or at planting time and then apply the rest through the pivot at regular intervals, you’re minimizing the risk of losing your investment should the crop get hailed out or somehow destroyed,” he says. “However, if you put on the majority of fertilizer early in the season and the crop gets hailed out, you still have to pay the fertilizer bill.”