Maruyama Hires New Technical Sales Support Manager

Maruyama has appointed Jay Larsen its new technical sales support manager. Larsen was previously with Shindaiwa, Inc., where he held the position of technical services representative for 11 years; in 2001, he was promoted to Shindaiwa marketing manager for North America. Prior to Shindaiwa, Larsen worked for Oregon Cutting Systems as a performance analysis technician. He is a graduate of Clatsop College.

Red Wing Software Hosts 30th Anniversary Open House

Red Wing Software recently hosted an open house celebrating 30 years of providing business and accounting software. Attended by customers, partners, past and current employees, as well as Red Wing Chamber of Commerce members, the evening featured a video account of the past three decades, refreshments and tours of the historic building, which used to be the former Burnside School. Customers from as far away as Washington, Montana, Kansas, New Jersey, Wisconsin and Minnesota came to enjoy the event.

For more information, visit www.redwingsoftware.com.

Amiad AMF Wins California Title 22 Approval

The Amiad Automatic Microfiber (AMF) filtration system received approval for use as a filtration technology for achieving the required turbidity level under the California Water Recycling Criteria, also known as Title 22. The company’s 20-micron system received the state’s official approval; the AMF system is also available for 10, 7, 3 and 2-micron levels of filtration.

The Amiad AMF system captures sediment in microfibers tightly wound around plastic cartridges, and then automatically cleans itself with a high-velocity stream of water deflected off the plastic cartridges.

The Title 22 approval identifies the Amiad AMF as a complement to an approved disinfection process. Disinfection technologies approved under the recycling criteria include chlorine, UV or ozone. In addition to aiding in compliance with California’s rigorous standards for water recycling, Amiad has demonstrated that sediment pre-filtration optimizes chemical use, reduces shadowing and scattering of UV radiation and minimizes the creation of disinfection byproducts.

For more information, visit www.amiadusa.com.

Klamath Basin Farmers Get Rights To Grow, Market New Purple Potato

Klamath Basin Fresh Direct (KBFD), an association of potato farmers along the Oregon-California border, has been awarded exclusive rights to grow and market a new purple fingerling developed by the USDA and three Northwest universities. Purple Pelisse is the first specialty potato that Oregon State University, the University of Idaho, Washington State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have jointly made available for public consumption.

KBFD plans to market it as a potato that can be boiled, fried and roasted. The group plans to change the name of the potato, which it will grow organically and market to high-end supermarkets and restaurants in the United States.

The potato resulted from a cross made by USDA research geneticist Chuck Brown in 2000 and was initially christened POR01PG16-1. It’s part of the Pacific Northwest Tri-State Breeding Program, which develops potatoes for growers and processors in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. The program has released about three dozen varieties since it began in 1984. OSU conducted most of the field trials on the Purple Pelisse, so it owns the original rights to it.

Washington State Potato Updates

Collaboration among the Washington State Potato Commission (WSPC), the USDA Agricultural Research Service, the University of Idaho, Oregon State University and Washington State University has resulted in the award of over $2 million in USDA Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program funds targeted for research to improve pest management in potato fields. The potato commission funds research on pest management every year, but there is still much to learn, according to WSPC Research Director Andy Jensen, one of the grant coordinators.

The three-year project will begin in the field next season, with a concerted effort on planning and getting things moving this fall.

For more information, visit www.potatoes.com.