As you may have noticed on our cover this year, there’s a little banner at the right-hand corner of the page. It’s a symbol of our 10th year as a magazine, a small time compared to the rest of our Ag group publications.

As I mentioned on GrowingMagazine.com, the four books would resemble a perfectly crafted Venn diagram of agricultural topics. As FARMING and Growing cover the farming and commercial growing industry, Tree Services focuses on woodlot and arbor professionals alongside American Nurseryman, which concentrates on the horticultural world.

Specifically, American Nurseryman is a staple in its respective industry, moving steadily in its 111th year as a magazine. The horticultural industry has been around throughout modern history as much as the art of growing. As for our group, the paths intersect at the topic of greenhouses.

When it comes to equipment and supplies, it doesn’t really matter—to a certain degree— whether a plastic canopy is over a batch of tomatoes or abelia lucky lots. This is the time of the year when we shine a light on such things.

As September premieres the fall season, thoughts of greenhouse management become prominent, especially if dealing with heat and any anticipated frost. For instance, our feature, written by Sally Colby, describes how greenhouse growers are using biological control agents in their integrated pest management programs. Also, our Growing Know-How column shows how year-round greenhouse growing is an economically viable option.

For those of you planning your greenhouses for the fall, good luck to you. As you well know, there are many aspects to consider — pro and con. We hope you find the information in this issue helpful toward your greenhouse endeavors. If you need more information about greenhouses and nurseries, please visit GrowingMagazine.com as well as Amerinursery.com.

COVER PHOTO VLADGRIN/ISTOCK